Karavansara

East of Constantinople, West of Shanghai


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Down the Nile on a steamboat

So it went like this. this morning, about one hour after posting the previous post in which I said I’m all out of time, overworked and juggling a lot of projects at the same time, I went and pitched a story to a magazine – and in half an hour I got a reply and a go ahead.
It’s not yet a sale, but it’s a new project with very good legs on which to stand.

Why did I do it if I’m so overworked?
Well, because it was a perfect opportunity to write a story I’ve been sitting on for six months now. Because I know and respect the editors. Because I live with this constant fear that the money will run out, and so I take as many paid gigs as I can get.

But let’s admit it – a five-lines pitch being approved like that is good for the ego. I am told that bragging about such things is in poor taste, but what the heck, it looks like I’m good after all.

So here now I am taking a break from my writing for a cup of tea, and meanwhile doing some lightweight research for my new project… and why not share?
Enjoy!


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Running out of time

Both literally and metaphorically, that is.
And both globally and personally, in more than one way: I have a ton of things to do, time is running out on a number of deadlines, and one of these is for a 4000-words story about… time running out, for all of us.
Looks like my writing life’s become terribly meta, and all that.
And it gets better (well, sort of)

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The Rose and the Sword: Flesh + Blood (1985)

Rutger Hauer’s gone, and I wanted to rewatch one of his movies. I would have liked to watch Soldier of Orange, one of his earlier works, but I do not have a copy, so I settled for second best – Paul Verhoeven’s Flesh + Blood, from 1985. Also known as The Rose and the Sword.

And I’ll open with a disclaimer – the movie is popular today mostly because it was the inspiration of Kintaro Miura’s fantasy manga Berserk, and I think this is a pity – because the movie stands on its own merits, and it is worthy of being watched and enjoyed as something more as the inciting event of a comic book (I am not a fan of Miura, and I find his fans insufferable, so sue me).

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