Karavansara

East of Constantinople, West of Shanghai

The comfort of strangers

3 Comments

It’s been rough going these last two months, and it’s not over yet.
I’m pushing myself to keep writing and putting together ideas, because it’s either keep moving or die, and yet I’m once again going through one of my bouts of black moods.

In particular, I’m somewhat tired of failing repeatedly in learning from past errors, especially where evaluating other people comes into play.
If I were as good at picking the right horses as I am in trusting the wrong people, I could make a living at the racetrack.

And yet there is an up side, and it’s the fact that in these two months, as people took a bad turn for a number of reasons and old friends and connections vanished or turned out to be more than willing to move to Cold Shoulder County, I was also treated, again and again at the kindness of strangers, receiving a helpful hand from distant acquaintances.

So I can’t really say I’m losing my faith in humanity – I am not, because humanity is great as always. Maybe it’s the slice of humanity I kept close that’s not that great.

Anyway – I’m wasting a lot of time, and I should be working on a thousand different projects.
But we’ll get out of this pit yet.

Meanwhile, some good music to close this dreary Sunday.

Author: Davide Mana

Paleontologist. By day, researcher, teacher and ecological statistics guru. By night, pulp fantasy author-publisher, translator and blogger. In the spare time, Orientalist Anonymous, guerilla cook.

3 thoughts on “The comfort of strangers

  1. Words right out of my mouth, it all sounds terribly familiar. And here I thought that other’s slices of humanity were always better (another version of the “grass is always greener” I guess?).

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    • There’s a lot of good people out there. We should not allow the few toxic individuals that take center stage to convince us of the contrary.

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      • Absolutely, experience helps a lot dealing with that, as always…maybe you don’t learn completely, but at least it takes less time to recognize who you should trust and who you shouldn’t

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